Saturday, December 24, 2016

The Year I Lost My Christmas Spirit

I've always loved Christmas. It also happens to be my birthday, so for all the reasons non Christmas-babies love their birthdays and love Christmas, I love it all in one day.

I remember saying once, "well, if all else fails, there's always Christmas to look forward to." I remember creeping down the stairs to curl up underneath the tree many mornings of the month of December, and always wanting to be the first one awake Christmas morning so I could creep downstairs and see the transformation. We were an "all presents appear magically" sort of family.



I don't remember when I realized Santa wasn't real, but I know it didn't bother me - because what I believed in him to be true, remained. That there is goodness in the world, and kindness, and generosity, and yes, even a little bit of magic.

But this year, I've had no Christmas spirit or sense of magic. The month started with phone call after phone call from people battling illnesses, faced with unexpected surgeries, divorces, difficult work moments, car accidents, premature babies fighting with every literal ounce, couples desperately wishing they would conceive, broken hearts...

And then the month went on, and my littlest got a terrible cold, and then she got lice, and then she had an allergic reaction to the lice treatment oil, and then she missed days of school. We seemed to rally Friday of last week, shipped the kids off to my brothers so my husband and I could have 24 hours kid-free, and then woke up Saturday morning to a house 45 degrees. One week later, I can tell you it's a super expensive broken furnace, and finding dry firewood in the Pacific NorthWest in December is sort of like going Black Friday shopping at 5pm and expecting to still find a good deal.

It's been an unbelievably discouraging month - I've thrown my hands up in the air just a few times, muttering about Decembers ungraceful exit after an exceptionally ungraceful year. "I get it, 2016, you had a bad attitude, through and through. Just wrap it up, already."  And I've had a good number of cries, too. Rather than this season being full of the magic and anticipation I'm so used to, I've instead found myself rallying every day to try and keep the magic & anticipation for my children, while somehow not glossing past the reality of what feels like a much harder season - not just for me (and a furnace is a small thing, in all truth), but a hard season for many.

I don't blog a lot about what my "religious beliefs"  are- if you want a religious blog with lots of scripture references, there are many. But, a lot of people are done with scripture references and Jesus talk, and frankly, I don't blame them. I talk about the truths that guide my life, and the lessons I am learning, and the hope I have in tomorrow to be better than today - and I could say (accurately) they are based in my "religious beliefs", but that somehow cheapens them.

But, what I will say is this. This year, in the year I lost my Christmas spirit, I am unbelievably grateful for the message of Emmanuel. We've almost ruined that word, too, tossing it around on greeting cards & loud proclamations instead of whispering it with breathless wonder. It should fill us with breathless wonder that the divine decided to interlace itself with bits of hair & skin.

This year I'm clinging to God with the fierce premies
with the new cancer patients
with the families waiting by hospital bedsides
with families buying caskets for too young sons taken too soon
with the broken hearted, smiling outside for everyone else's benefit but weeping or numb inside
with the depressed, and the anxious, and the lonely
with the ones who can't conceive
with the addicts breaking free

I told my kids the miracle of Christmas is that God is with us - not coming tomorrow, not far off, not here only on the good days. God with us. With me. With you.

And even if you don't believe in God, that's totally fine. The beauty of this whole thing called life is that each of us contains the kindness, the generosity, the hope that Christmas or even just the Holiday season is all about.

And when we share it with others it pushes back against everything this past year, and our lifetimes, have tried to bog us down with. It pushes back against the lorries driving into crowds of holiday shoppers, and hijacked planes, and shootings at movie theaters, and children abandoned and abused, and jobs wrongfully lost, and bodies callously used. It pushes back against the temptation to cave into fear, worry, anger, hatred, apathy and says instead: "I will grieve, and I will mourn, and I will be with those who are grieving and mourning, but I also believe tomorrow can be better than today - whether I'm believing that for me, or for you, or for all the broken hearted, I believe."

May your holiday season this year, even if you don't celebrate any holiday, be filled with hope, and even more importantly, an assuredness that you have the power to spread hope - not because you will brush aside the darkness and the pain of others, but because you can be to to others as God is to me and to you: with us.


Thursday, October 13, 2016

Fear Itself

I know a lot about fear. I've experienced a lot of it over the course of my life from the time I was a young child, all the way up to last night and even this morning. Some of it has been in response to things that would make anyone afraid, some of it hasn't been.

I hear a lot of people talking about how we're angry as a country, about how Donald Trump has tapped into people's rage. If I have learned anything over the past several years as I've sought to understand more about my own anger (which I definitely have ample supply of at times), it's that anger is almost always a sign of fear. Anger goes on the offensive, shame goes on the defensive, and at the root of both is fear. Fear that there isn't enough, or worse, that I am not enough.

I don't think America is angry - I think America is afraid. And what's so incredibly heartbreaking to me, is that rather than speaking to our fear - our politicians and media and even in our interactions with one another, we are feeding off of and catering to our fear, all under the guise of justified anger.

I can say that I am angry Donald Trump promoted the sexual assault of women, but really I'm more afraid that so many people minimized it as locker room banter or 'guy talk', and I'm afraid of the implications of watching a presidential debate being the catalyst for needing to explain sexual assault to my 5 and 6 year old. And I'm afraid I'm not enough to change it.

I can say that I am angry Hillary Clinton seems to have gotten away with an incredible amount of lies and deceit through her time in political office, but I'm really more afraid that this massive experiment of a truly diverse democracy may in fact be a sham, and that maybe George Orwell's predictions weren't so far off. And I'm afraid I'm not enough to change it.

I can say that I am angry the media continues to feed my fear by running sensational headlines, showing me gruesome images zoomed in on the most acute moments of human tragedy so I am unable to see the immense goodness that permeates the world, but really I'm more afraid of the implications of having such biased media that I have nowhere to turn for neutral facts and am subsequently somewhat unable to actually form my own personal perspective. And I'm afraid I'm not enough to change it.

I can say I am angry that our economy isn't in a better place - aren't we supposed to be the greatest nation in the world? But really, I am afraid there won't be jobs for my children, or maybe even for me or that when I get to the age of 65, I won't be able to retire because life will have cost too much. And I'm afraid I'm not enough to change it.

I can say I am angry about the rising cost of health care, and the corruption of our taxes, but really I am afraid that when I get the cancer diagnosis, the money won't be there, or when my son crosses the road at the unprotected pedestrian cross walk at the top of the hill he'll get hit by a car because the taxes I paid weren't used to actually impact my neighborhood. And I'm afraid I'm not enough to change it.

I can say that I'm angry terrorism is on the rise in our country, but really I'm afraid that despite the fact our country spreads from sea to shining sea, somehow so much hatred has been generated the threat now comes not only from without but from within. And I'm afraid I'm not enough to change it.

I can say I'm angry there is so much hatred everywhere, so much divisiveness, but really I'm afraid that what I thought was true about this country, that's it's a place that values liberty and justice for all, isn't actually true. And I'm afraid I'm not enough to change it.

I can say that I am angry. And I am. But I'm really afraid. And maybe, just maybe, you are too.

Here's the thing about living in a heightened state of fear, which I think our country as a whole has been doing for the past decade and a half more than even before - it turns on something in our brains that tells us threat is always imminent. This guarantee of imminent threat does something else to us: it's called hyper-vigilance. I know about hyper-vigilance because I live in it almost all the time - it means everything could almost always go wrong at every given moment.  It means it's not a matter of 'if', it's a matter of 'when' and 'what'.

The muscle tightness in my chest is a sign I'm having a heart attack, the knock at the door I'm not expecting probably means my husband got hit by a bus while riding his bike to work, the phone call from the unidentified number means there is a shooter at my sons elementary school, a dog howling means the big earthquake is going to hit in a matter of seconds. It's not 'if', it's just 'when' and 'what' and my best option is to always be prepared. For everything. Which means I have to know everything. And can only trust myself. But I'm responsible for everyone I love. But I can only love so many, so I better love those who are the least threat to me, because then I have a little more capacity - to prevent all of the 'whats' and 'whens'.

Hyper-vigilance is exhausting, because it is never satisfied that the threat is gone. It is always seeking to find the threat, minimize the threat, control the situation, and identify the next threat. The other thing hyper-vigilance tells us to do is protect what's ours, circle the wagons, identify the threat and the enemy and do everything we can to keep them out. Hyper-vigilance drives us straight into the arms of those who are most like us, and fixates on any narrative, news story, or situation that helps us identify an external threat and tells us how to stop it. Hyper-vigilance isolates us, and then it destroys us because the real threat isn't from out there, it's from inside our very own minds, hearts, and souls.

The challenge of humanity is that our mammalian nature tells us to self-preserve, but the reality of our inevitable interactions with other humans mandates we pursue the preservation of all, or we'll all be destroyed.

We are doing this as a country. And it has to stop. Why? For this one simple reason: fear begets anger which begets going on the offensive which begets isolation which begets hatred which begets destruction. And once that cycle takes it full course, we really do have something to fear - ourselves driven by fear.

This maddening cycle will continue until men and women say enough is enough and begin jumping off the wheel. The good news? You can jump off at any time in the cycle - truly, you can.

How? Stop feeding your fear. Stop listening to the news all the time. Stop reading only the headlines that make your heart race a little bit harder and instead read the headlines that make you smile. Stop looking at your phone, and look out the window. Stop trying to fight for every cause and just pick the one that makes your heart soar when you see the smallest snippets of success. Stop talking only to people who agree with you, and instead listen to the people you don't understand, because they are just afraid, too.

Stop listening to the voices telling you that you have to vote for either major political party or you're throwing your vote away. That's a lie. Stand for what you believe in - not against what you hate. If 40% of the American population votes for 3rd party or write-in candidates that will make a HUGE statement to our politicians and to the world. Sure, maybe one of the main political parties will win this time around, and many people would agree that's not ideal, but next time there will be hope that perhaps democracy can work.

Stop obsessing over what you can't control - you can't control how the state of Florida votes, whether or not we put troops on the ground in Syria, or if your public parks are turned into campgrounds for the homeless. You can (and in my opinion, should) call your elected councilmen, mayors, governors, and other politicians to let them know where you stand. But then - let it go.

Instead, turn your eyes to what you can influence & control - your interactions with your neighborhood, your family, your work place, your bus commute, your church or mosque or temple, your interactions with every human in every place you go today. You can control that.

You can smile, at every single person you see. You can introduce yourself to the parent at your kids school, or the new colleague, or the woman in your zumba class who you at a glance have very little in common with. And then invite them over for dinner. You can text your neighbors who you aren't sure like you to ask if they need anything from Target when you're running errands. You can slow down for pedestrians and smile at them when they walk slowly, instead of honking. You can tell your bus driver thank you. You can stop and offer an encouraging word to the mom in the grocery store struggling to manage her 3 crying kids, 40 rolls of toilet paper, 6 packs of diapers, and 2 bottles of wine. You can put down your phone and read to your kids. You can stop reading the news and look into your partners eyes and ask them how they really are. You can say thank you to the colleague who did that little thing they were supposed to do but didn't really want to. Just tell them thank you.

When you see someone marginalized, stand in the gap and show them love instead. When someone yells at you, or cuts you off in traffic, or says something rude to you respond with gentleness and self-control. When you you are marginalized or threatened or even wounded (because you will be), take a deep breath and press into change, find the sources of strength and love around you - don't give into fear.

You have SO much control. Is something going to go wrong today? yeah, absolutely. Is it going to be catastrophic? Sure, maybe, for some of us. But probably not. Is whatever goes wrong going to pass? 100% yes.

Is something going to go right today? Absolutely. Is it going to be the best thing in your life? Sure, maybe, for some of us. But probably not. Is whatever goes right going to pass? 100% yes.

And you'll remember both - but you only get to sink your teeth into one. You simply cannot live with a heart of fear and a heart of love at the same time. You cannot commit to being all in and simultaneously try to run all the way out. You just can't. There are seasons for both - sometimes you need to let yourself feel afraid, and just cry, and hole up with people and in places you feel safe. But you should only do that so you can recover and heal and learn and then go right back out and love even harder than before.

Both of our major political parties, and every single media source I've read would like you to believe the answer to your fear is in anger, defensiveness, policy, or some other black and white easy to find answer. It's not. The answer to your fear is Love. Perfect love drives out fear - it always has, it always will. That's really the only way it works, and the good news is that when love begins to drive out fear it radically transforms you, me, and everyone else around us.

And the even better news? Fear doesn't ever drive out perfect love. It can bang it up, and knock you down, and discourage almost every last shred of light out of your soul until it seems dormant - but it will never fully drive perfect love out. A single light can shine bright in the darkness, and no matter how thick the darkness, the light won't be put out.

Don't let yourself be told otherwise - you have the capacity for perfect love within you, and miraculously, you have the capacity to spread it to others and to awaken the perfect love in them. It starts in the littlest of ways, and the littlest of ways often make the biggest impact because they can sink through the smallest of cracks in the hardest of hearts.  How do I know? Because in my moments of greatest fear, I've had the hardest of hearts - it was the only thing that made sense when I was trying to be my own protection. But the smallest acts of the greatest Love are what transformed me, and now I know the anecdote to fear (for I am still afraid every day), it's Love.

So, Love. Today. All day. This whole next tumultuous month and election season. Love. Speak for goodness, even if the catalyst for speaking up is the presence of hate. Don't just speak against hate - speak for love. No one is asking if something is wrong - we all know it is. People are asking where to look next, and the answer is, and always has been, to Love.

And no majority vote is needed for love to win. Love wins. With a single vote, it wins. Today I choose love. Not because I am not angry or afraid - I am both. But because I know love is the only answer to my fear. And I promise it is to yours, too. Give love, and receive it from others when they give it to you. It really is, profoundly, that simple.


Thursday, September 22, 2016

Why Using My Perspective as a Woman Has Helped me Understand Racial Oppression A Little Bit Better

I have struggled over the past several years with how to engage in the 'conversation' about racial oppression in the United States. I don't identify fully with any side of this conversation - my spirit was birthed and resides in white wrapping, but that same spirit was shaped in Kenya where I was raised both by my white parents and the black village I grew up. I did not first learn the ways of one skin color, and then learn the ways of another - I learned them both at the same time.

My hope in writing today is to share with you just a bit about how my process has gone, in the hopes that it helps you along yours. This is written with white people (specifically men) in mind, and I recognize it may offend, though that is not my intent. I also recognize I have much to learn, and that despite my best intentions, I may say something here that would be hurtful to a person of color. Should I do that, though I will do my absolute best not to, please know that was never my intent, and I am committed to continuing to learn.

For women, if this triggers something for you, please know I believe God can heal and redeem anything. Whatever experiences of oppression you have had as a woman are entirely outside of God's design, and He delights in you.

*********

I was recently in a group where I was asked to do an exercise on discrimination; one of the questions asked me to write a list of people groups I grew up fearing or being uncomfortable around. I sat still for a while, genuinely searching for an answer and trying to objectively and honestly run through the list of possible suspects. The first answer that came to my mind initially surprised me, and then wasn't a surprise at all: men.

I first became aware that men viewed women as objects when I was about 6; in Maasai culture, it was common for fathers and grooms to conduct the transaction of a daughter becoming a bride. Promises were made years in advance, as men staked their claims to girls who would one day become slightly older girls old enough to bear children. I don't know the number of times I stood silently by as a little girl, listening to men ask my father for me as one of their future brides. I do remember my father said no 100% of the time, and for this I am grateful.

I also remember, at the age of 9, realizing most of my age mates were beginning to prepare for the start of their menstrual cycles, and their subsequent need to be ready to become the brides they had been 'traded' as. I remember finding my refuge in books, spending hours hiding inside from the realities that faced me because of my gender when I walked out the door.

When I was in late elementary school, we returned to the US for a year. I was struck by the use of the female form to sell products ranging from cars to cigarettes to sunscreen. I realized the female form had power - but that power wasn't because the female body was valued for it's strength or intrinsic worth - instead the female body was a tool to be used for other people's benefit and pleasure. It was also, therefore, a mighty tool for manipulation.

I realized I happened to be put in one of those female bodies for my spirit and soul to do their work on this earth. I began to understand my greatest limitations actually had very little to do with me, and had already been predetermined by how others labeled my form.

When I was in middle school, I listened as some of my agemates recounted stories of abuse. I realized I was an outlier, not because of anything I had done, but because I had been lucky. And I realized I wasn't guaranteed to remain an outlier - that sexual abuse may one day become a part of my story. So far it's not part of my own personal story, for which I grateful, but I live every day with the reality that one day it might be. And I know the chance is higher for that to be a part of my daughter's story than it is my son's.

When I was in early high school, I began to perfect the "don't mess with me" face I used towards men who looked too long, or scanned up and down too many times. I also began to perfect my, "I'm not a threat" face for men in power who fear others strength. Sometimes, both are needed simultaneously.

I also sought to fight against the script that Evangelical Western Christianity had given me: that my body was intended for the Lord and for my husband, but not really for me. My 16 year old self tried to find a place for me to enjoy being in my own body and have some control over how it was viewed by others. Sometimes I succeeded, sometimes I failed. I learned that my body could be turned against me as a weapon if I trusted others with it, and I learned that even if I saw myself as valuable, I wasn't always perceived that way. In fact, as far as broader society was concerned, my self-narrative was secondary to the female form-narrative.

When I was in college, living in the United States indefinitely for the first time in my life, I was thrust into the throes of what is a co-ed college dorm, and was overwhelmed by the gender, racial, and socio-economic milieu. I met and married my husband quickly, and I know a part of that was because I knew I'd found a good man I always wanted in my corner of the ring. I'm so glad I did. He has been a tender partner in healing many of the wounds I picked up along the way as a result of being a woman.

In my late teens/early twenties, I also began to experience the onslaught of unsolicited feedback a woman in American can expect simply for stepping out of her home. Whether it was through advertising, the media, or social interactions, I received a lot of feedback on what it meant to be a woman, and a lot of feedback for my particular take on the role. Runs around campus were marked by how many catcalls I received - not because I'm particularly worth calling at, but simply because I had the audacity to show an interest in the health of my form. Comments were made about my appearance, my body, and even my food intake, "are you going to eat that whole burrito? That's hot. I love girls who can eat."

I began to recognize that to enjoy my own form, simply by dressing it in a way that made me feel beautiful, or decorating it with simple things like earrings or mascara, somehow sent a signal that I considered my body an art piece I had put on public display, apparently with a comment box. And the comments rolled in, unwanted, but each one leaving an impression.

As I entered pregnancy, childbirth, and mothering, I realized how many systems were stacked against me. Maintaining a career was harder, caring for a young child in public was isolating, and once again, advertising and the media quickly intervened to let me know what my role was as a mother, and how frequently I was failing.

As I've navigated through young motherhood, and am emerging into young-middle motherhood, I've found I have a bit more time on my hands - time to go out for drinks with friends, curl my hair, and go to the gym. It turns out my comment box is still fully operational. I was most recently (ie - 3 weeks ago) approached by a man at my front door, after he had completed the grocery delivery I'd placed online:

"you seem really fun," He said, glancing at my legs in shorts that suddenly felt too short. "Want to hang out sometime?"
"Oh, thanks," I said (because I didn't want to let my frustration show; I didn't know how he'd respond if I told him how wildly inappropriate it was for him to be hitting on me in the doorway of my home, while my son sat on the couch inches away. My husband wasn't home, and I didn't want to anger the man leaning possessively against my door frame), "but I'm married and have two kids." (men respond better when I'm already possessed by someone else, better than if I honestly say 'I didn't ask for your attention. I simply ordered milk online.')
"That's ok," he responded, looking directly at me, "I'm not looking for anything serious."

I've never felt more relieved when my husband came home than I did that day, even though I knew the reality was, I wasn't in any real danger. It was just a man who felt entitled to presenting his interest in me after a milk delivery. But it was an event smack in the middle of the backdrop of my life - where I've experienced dozens, probably hundreds, of micro-aggressions that have assured me I am not as safe as those who weren't born into the gender I was. Whether it's cat calls, being followed around a store, being called "sweetheart" and "honey" by men older than my father when I'm at a bar, or being unable to concentrate on the conversation with one of my girl friends because the man sitting directly behind her keeps eying all  of me...each interaction becomes a part of the canvas that sets part of the backdrop for every day of my life. That's how, I think, micro aggressions work. They slowly corrode and shape like a steady stream of single drops of water in a cave.

But the unjust treatment I've experienced as a woman isn't just about my physical form or 'how fun I seem", it's also about who I am. I can't count the times I've been laughed at, discredited, or held as exceptional when I've offered to do things like change a tire, take apart an appliance to fix it, or lead a group. I've been, on more than a few occasions, described as stubborn, opinionated, pushy, dominant, and intimidating by both men and women. But when I watch men engage in the same ways I do, they are described in the way I see myself: strong, leaders, confident, visionaries, full of ideas.

There isn't really a conclusion to this story, because it's still ongoing. I still wouldn't walk downtown at night by myself, and I still lock the doors as soon as I get in the car at the shopping center. I still am aware of every man around me, and know I'll have more moments where I pretend to get a phone call to avoid interacting with a man who's been eying me as I walk through Target or Trader Joes. I'll still pretend to ignore the lewd comments directed at me or other women when I take the bus. I'll still inwardly cringe every time I hear a crass word for one of my body parts used as insult. I will still see the way some men look at women when that woman isn't watching. She might not be, but other women see it, and so even if we don't always see it when it's directed at us, we sense the gaze on us. And yes, it makes us feel unsafe.

I'll continue to navigate what it means to be the woman God created me to be - strong, confident, full of ideas and passion, a leader - but I know to do it well, I have to remain aware of the gender constructs that still (many times unintentionally) remain. I know I will need to have a lot of grace and patience as so many people, men and women alike (myself included), try to navigate the understanding of these constructs and the way forward to healthier ones.

I'll keep having hard conversations with my daughter, and with my son - but they'll be different when it comes to my daughter. I'll tell her to walk a certain way, to have a strong handshake, to take care of her appearance, and to look people in the eye, "if you don't send a message that you respect your body, other people won't think  they have to respect your body either. Send a message that you respect you body, and that you expect others to do the same." That's not just about her body, it's about everything that is her - body, spirit, soul, and dreams.

I'm already teaching her to use her 'no' and to use it loudly when she feels scared. I'm already telling her that secrets that make her feel scared or hurt should never be secrets, no matter what anyone says. I'm already teaching her that she is strong, capable, brave, and important - no matter what anyone else says. I'm already teaching her that what she believes of herself is more important than any message she'll receive from anywhere else. I'm teaching carefully, doing everything I can to protect her innocence and optimism and trust of the goodness of the world, but knowing she will need a different type of internal strength to be true to who God created her to be than my son might.

And it is through this lens, as a woman, as a mother of a daughter, that I have been able to understand a bit more, and have my eyes more opened to seeing the racial injustices that occur around me everyday. I've started to see the change in facial expression on the cashier's face based on the color of the person she is serving. I've started to see the way mothers reach out to hold their children's hands more around some skin colors than they do around others. I've started to see the realities of the color map that could be laid on top of my cities geographical map, and I've become more aware of where I live in it - in the middle of my own color.

And I've become more aware of my own responses to other people, and had to come face to face with some of my own ingrained responses to people based on their skin color - even though in my head and heart I consciously hold no animosity or fear towards anyone based on anything external. Somewhere, along the way, I picked habits up, and now, it is my job to discover them and undo what needs undone.

I know this has been lengthy, but there is nothing brief about the complexities of oppression of any people group - whether it be based on gender, skin color, economic status, or sexual orientation.

My hope in sharing this, as a middle class white woman living in a safe white neighborhood of Seattle, is to begin lending my voice to this conversation. Perhaps gender discrimination is more accessible for you than racial discrimination, for whatever reason. Perhaps hearing a bit of my experience as a woman, especially if you know me but didn't know this part, will help you begin to see other significant parts of other people's stories that you didn't realize you didn't know. Perhaps, if you feel some increased understanding of the reality of discomfort and threat to safety I live with as a woman, you'll have a framework for beginning to understand the threats and oppression that people of color live with. Again, I'm not saying my experience as a woman is the same as a person of color - they are different, but the lens of one helped me better understand the other, and perhaps it can help you, too.

Or, perhaps it simply helps you better understand gender discrimination a bit better - that would be valuable, too.

We all have a story with racial discrimination, because it is a part of our culture, whether we acknowledge it or not. Once we do acknowledge it, we can begin to see our part in it, and importantly, decide what part we will play in it going forward.

And, if I may gently suggest a hard thought: indecision is not a part of reconciliation and justice. Indecision is simply the decision to continue playing the same role you've been playing. And maybe that's a pretty decent role - but I know I wanted to be sure I hadn't settled on 'decent' if I was capable of more.

If the news of this week, and the years past, have caused you grief - keep grieving, but don't let your grief turn to indefinite paralyzation. You can withdraw to grieve, reflect, and even to recover. But my prayer is that you can find the perspective shift that you need to begin learning about the realities that make the truth we want to believe ring hollow: "one nation, under God, with liberty and justice for all."

For once we learn the realities, we have a better chance of bringing about the good we so desperately want to be, and need to be, true.






Saturday, July 2, 2016

Today, when it was hard...

Today, I read a beautiful blog written on Huff Post titled "Instead I Held You." It really is a sweet and gentle reminder to stop and savor the sweet moments with our little ones. But, as a mother of an almost 5 year old and 6 1/2 year old, my little ones aren't falling asleep in my arms too often any more, and I don't need the reminder to stop cleaning as they fall asleep in my arms, because it happens so rarely I recognize it as a treasure.

But, as my kids have gotten older, and necessarily branch away from me so they can become their own independent and capable selves, I realize the sentiment holds, but it goes maybe like this...

Today, my patience had worn thin because I hadn't had nearly as much alone time as I needed, or time to just rest, or read a book, or sit and not think for a minute. And in the middle of all that, you'd had a bad day too. So...

Today, when you walked in the door from school, dropped your backpack in the middle of the kitchen, and said, "I'm hungry. Where's my snack?" I didn't first tell you to put away your things and change your tone. I bent down, kissed you on the top of the head, and said I was glad to see you. You grunted, but you didn't pull away from my kiss, and I noticed.

Today, when you were angry because I turned off the TV so you could help me set the table, I didn't send you to your room on time out. I listened to your anger, and waited until you were calm enough to hear me say it's important to work as a team. You were still mad, but you took the dishes and slowly set the table. I simply said thank you. I noticed you kept coming back to the kitchen to 'not help', even after you were done setting the table.

Today, when you slammed your door after shouting that you hated me, I took deep breaths, and continued making your dinner. When you came out a few minutes later, I stopped what I was doing, turned and faced you, kneeling down to your level, and looking into your eyes, simply said, "I know you don't hate me, but when you use those words, it hurts my heart. I still love you." I let you walk away without forcing an apology, because I knew you heard me. And when you walked in and kissed my stomach, because that's how high you come now, and then quickly walked away, I knew you were sorry.

Today, when you kept speaking rudely to our guests and me, breaking family rules, and rolling your eyes at me, I didn't take away your toys or TV time. I gently asked you to come into your room with me, then I sat on the floor and asked if you wanted to sit with me. Turns out that's all you wanted. Just a few quiet minutes with me. We just sat there and took some deep breaths together. Sometimes company is hard on all of us.

Today, when your daddy and I were fighting, and you came in and started interrupting with an urgent need for string cheese right after dinner, I didn't yell at you. I stopped, looked at your dad with knowing eyes, and asked if it bothered you when we fought. You said yes. Your dad put his arm around me and I leaned in, even though we were mad, so you could see we were ok. I told you that we still loved each other, and sometimes you fight. And sometimes, when you fight, if you do it with love, you actually love each other more at the end. We asked if you wanted to watch us work through what we were arguing about. You did. So we argued as maturely as we could, hoping to teach you that conflict happens, and we have a choice how we engage with it. Later, I heard you fight with your sister; you were kind even though you were angry.

Today, when you told me I looked fat, I didn't tell you that it was a mean thing to say. I smiled, I told you I loved my body, and that I hoped you grew up to love yours, too. I told you that it doesn't matter what size your body is as long as you are taking care of it - eating healthy, exercising, making safe choices, and doing things that bring you joy. I also told you that in many places in the world, fat is a compliment - so hold your ideas loosely, and ask questions like "huh, I wonder why we do that/think that" before you jump in with both feet.

Today, when you came in to my room at 6:30am and told me you didn't want to go to school, I didn't say you had to. I asked why. When you explained it was, I quote,"unreasonable to expect me to sit still for 5 days, and then what, only get two days off? It's too much", I agreed and told you that you could stay home. As I was on the phone with the school office, telling them you were absent due to a mental health day, I smiled as I watched you building a playground out of scrap wood for the chickens.

Today, when your young boy eyes fell on the bikini clad bronze woman on the front of the magazine at the check out line, I didn't shoo you away or tell you stop. I asked what you were thinking. When you said you wondered why she was in her underwear, I sighed, and did my best to help you understand. To somehow help you learn about respecting bodies, yours and hers, and to also respect that it was her choice to be on the magazine in her bikini underwear. Then, I directed your sisters eyes to the magazine and asked you both if you thought she looked like a real woman, or if you thought they'd maybe changed the picture. You both said they'd changed the picture. I agreed, and said real bodies are beautiful and don't need photoshopped slimming.

Today, when you woke me up at 2am saying you were hungry, I didn't send you back to bed, I got up with you and we had a secret bowl of cheerios in our pajamas with just the little light over the stove to illuminate our faces. I was tired, but I want you to know when you're 16 years old that I'll have a 2am bowl of cheerios with you when something is on your mind, or you just need me to sit with you in the dark.

Today, when you said you just needed a Mommy Day, I didn't explain that sometimes I need to work and you'd just have to play by yourself this morning. I turned on my out of office and we went to get pedicures. Your fancy toes looked amazing, and I noticed when you played quietly for hours after we got home so I could get work done.

Today, when you told your sister she had to give you one of her toys or you would kick her, I didn't scold you hard and say you were violent. I pulled you to the side, and told you that when we only give someone two bad choices, we use our power to take away their power. Two bad choices isn't much of a choice. Then I gave you a second try, and you told your sister you'd like to play with her toys, could you trade for a bit?

Today, when you refused to get your shoes on when it was time to go, I didn't yell or storm you out to the car bare foot. I asked what was wrong, when you said it was my fault, I thought about your week and then asked you if it felt too busy. You said yes, and that you wished everyone in the world would just disappear except you and me. I understood and felt the same way. We cancelled our plans for the next day and spent it watching TV and snuggling instead.

Today, when you screamed at me that I was out of control, because let's be honest, I was borderline out of control as I was so tired and frustrated, I somehow found a deep breath, lowered my voice, and said you were right. I asked you for a time out for my sake, explaining that time outs are breaks to help us be our best, and I was sure I needed one. You gave me one, and after I'd calmed down, I apologized and asked your forgiveness. Hard as I try, I can't seem to make the right choice every time, but I promise to always ask your forgiveness.

Today, when it was hard, I got one piece of it closer to right. I don't always, even usually, but today I did. Today, when it was hard - for you, or for me, I tried to remember that we're in this together and I tried to show you that I love you. And I could tell you were trying, too.




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